Category Leadership

WE bow before NO ONE.

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Go with God now, Bill – thank you for all you’ve done.

I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”I doubt this is how he thought his life would end up when he first came to public attention in the Seventies. He was a skilled and sensitive portraitist of Sir Don Bradman and other great Aussies, and you can see in his paintings what he loved and cherished. He could have led just as successful a life far more quietly. But, when the Islamic Statists and the Oz statists alike decided to target him and his art, he didn’t flinch. He understood the malign alliance between Islamic imperialism and a squishy, appeasing west. One of his cartoons shows a spotty T-shirted kid announcing he’s off to join ISIS in “the war on western freedoms”. “No need for that, son,” says his dad. “They’re giving them away.”

Mr. Trump goes to Washington…

…takes some names, kicks some ass… May God continue to bless you, Donald – and may this country continue to be blessed also. Call ’em like you see ’em – liars, cheats, thieves…traitors… Give ’em HELL and let me know if you think I can help in any way!

New Boss Doesn’t Seem To Be Same As The Old Boss…

I don’t think the next administration is going to be as obnoxiously ‘helpful’ to the American people as that of The Current Occupant. It has come to my attention that a significant number of appointees, in Cabinet and Advisory positions, are retired MARINES! Battlefield Marines – because that’s what Marines ARE. Their duty to our […]

A National Treasure

Fred Thompson, my choice for President for nearly 20 years, has died. National Review’s John Fund said he cared more about America than he did about being President. He’d have been a good one…and he will be sorely missed by so many, even those – like me – who only FELT like they’d like him if […]

Happy Happy!

I got a new washer and have small deep freeze on order. But the computer died and we are learning to make do with Kindle and cell phone. So far, so good! Will be back soon – kinda busy prepping for kids’ visit next week. Have a good one, and … REMEMBER BRIAN TERRY!

Veteran’s Day Parade 2014

I had the privilege of walking in Pensacola’s Veterans Day parade today. The weather cooperated, parking was a breeze, and the company from ECAT was top-notch. At the little park where there is a replica of The Wall and several other memorials, there was a space for vendors and such. I found one where I […]